What Has Become of the Electoral College?

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I’m running for National Delegate (Ted Cruz) #940 and Presidential Elector #516.

Several state delegates have asked me why I am running for Presidential Elector. One delegate raised the pressing question “why does it matter?” and wouldn’t the duties be merely “ceremonial” because electors are bound to vote for the presidential candidate who gets the majority of the popular vote – or the elector is replaced?”

I’ve studied the Electoral College, the history of the development of the 12th Amendment, the current version of “electoral college” and the campaign to eliminate the Electoral College altogether and create simply a National Popular Vote.

I’d like to thank my friends Gary and Carolyn Alder for publishing a small booklet that explains in detail The Evolution and Destruction of the Original Electoral College.

Here is a brief summary. I urge you to get a copy of their book, Here is the website.

The destruction of the original electoral college and how the president was elected, has encouraged the destruction of the republic. Coupled with the addition of the 17th Amendment, which changed how the US Senate was elected, the United States is today a democratic republic (leaning democracy) rather than the representative republic which was originally intended.

The framers took great care to ensure that no branch of government would overpower the other and that the states – large and small – would have fair representation.

The quarrels we are witnessing between presidential candidates and their consultants strategically seeking to damage the opponent is magnified by these perversions. The 12th Amendment destroyed the electoral college and is responsible for the national delegate system we have today. While it’s stated intent was to give more citizens a vote (democracy) it actually removed accountability from the people and created a monster – the lobbyist culture that has bankrupt this nation with an out-of-control and ever-growing, unelected bureaucracy.

Let’s examine the original electoral college as a first step to understand what it is today. The Framers of the US Constitution created a complex representative republic with vertical and horizontal checks and balances, reflected in the nominating, selecting and final voting procedure for each branch of government.

Nomination

Article II, Section 1, Clause 2 stipulated that each state would designate a number of wise people named electors to nominate the best candidates for president. That number totaled the number of senators and representatives in Congress from each state. Qualifications precluded the members of the state’s federal delegation, elected officials and government employees.

It was left up to the states as to how the electors were appointed, either by the legislature or the people – or most commonly, a combination.

Today that would mean that Utah would have six electors, because Utah has two senators and four representatives. Because there are two candidates in a general election Utah would get 12 votes total. This formula is weighted to favor the smaller states.

The electoral college was created when the colonies were transitioning from equal representation in the Articles of Confederation to a bicameral congress, with one house represented by population and the other house maintaining the equal representation of the Articles of Confederation. This weighting does not disadvantage the more populous states, but it does elevate the influence of the less populous states.

In short, the selection of the best candidates for president was determined by a small number of people. To be an elector was a very important role.

The electors didn’t represent their states’ interests, but rather the nation’s interests. The five candidates that received the highest votes were sent to the House of Representatives if none received a majority of votes. Electors would cast two votes each for two candidates. So Utah, which has 6 federal seats would cast 12 votes.

Selection

Article II, Sec. 1, Clause 3 stipulates another qualification: At least one of the two candidates the electors voted for had to come from outside their state. They did not collaborate with other states, and they were not coerced to vote for the same candidate. These were nominating votes, not deciding votes.

Decision

The tally goes to the US House. The members then each get ONE vote for their state and whether choosing from among the top five or whether breaking a tie, the House makes the final decision. The person with the highest votes was elected President. The person with the highest votes after the President becomes Vice President.

It was expected there would be many candidates, but no political parties needed.

Today the Presidential Elector is a political pawn to serve the Party. The quest was no longer for quality, but for electability. We see this happening in this election cycle. The process diminished the role of elector to merely reflect the candidate the party selected. Because the parties had taken over, they did not like it when the President and Vice President were of two opposing parties. By then the parties did not like the idea of sending the candidates to the House for any reason – including breaking a tie.

So I’m running for Presidential Elector for two reasons: I want to experience being an Elector and I’d like to find ways to restore our Constitution … We are in a constitutional crisis. We need to WAKE UP, AMERICA!

There’s more, but for now this sums it up. If you’d like to read more, get a copy of the book!

Why You Should Vote for Me – for Elector (#516) AND National Delegate (#940)

So in response to the delegate question above, why delegates should consider voting for me for elector when it is merely “ceremonial:

Delegates should consider voting for me for both national delegate  #940 AND elector #516 because I understand what the real electoral college is supposed to be.  I understand how our election system has been turned upside down and perverted, forcing it to become a democracy instead of a republic.  

I have the same view of the Constitution that justice Scalia held: the Originalist view. We are far away from that original intent.

The founders created a constitutional republic. The constitution has been perverted to turn its election process into a democracy that has all but destroyed the checks and balances that they put into place.

Now progressives want to take what is left of the electoral college and turn it into a national popular vote, which would be the final nail in the coffin of the republic.  It would be a democracy that the founders despised because they knew history.

I would like to serve as an elector so that I can follow the rules that a corrupt political Establishment has put into place,  but also then to advocate from experience to restore the republic from what has been correctly described as now merely “ceremonial.”

I would then like to take that experience and broadcast it to help educate people to wake them up from the awful state in which we now find ourselves in this Constitutional crisis. 

I produce and host a daily talk radio show 10 hours a week called The Liberty Lineup.  It is a labor of love.  We are an all-volunteer team.  Its purpose is to stand for liberty and the principles of the Constitution and to expose those elected officials and unelected bureaucrats at federal, state and county levels who are violating the United States Constitution.

For this I am – we are – both loved and hated.

Our elected leaders in Utah for the most part are very uneducated about what the US Constitution means. They talk a lot about it and say they believe in the Constitution but their votes show that they really do not understand at all.  A starting point in making these changes would be to check out their voting records and ask them why they say they are Republican, but they vote with the Democrats.  

I’m looking forward to working with you to restore Liberty and the Constitution! 

Vote Cherilyn Eagar
Presidential Elector #516
National Delegate #940