Utah’s Caucus Again Misrepresented in the News

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I’m feeling more like a broken record as time goes on.  I want to say, “Just read the previous posts,” but I’d like to comment directly to statements made in today’s Deseret News article titled “Gov. Herbert stepping up pressure on GOP to settle ‘civil war.'”

Civil war?  My great grandfather fought in the real Civil War.  Governor, I know what that war was.  This is no civil war.  That’s hyperbole at its finest and a misrepresentation at best.

The author, Lisa Roche, also editorializes in her first sentence, rather than doing her journalistic duty and simply stating the facts and limiting all opinions to quotations within the article.  She identifies Herbert’s “civil war” as the candidate nomination compliance process that “limits the power of party delegates.”

That was an explosive choice of words.  Actually, the party’s concern is a constitutional matter:  does a private corporation have the right to freely assemble, to set its rules and determine qualifications of members and to define its statement of belief – its mission statement, if you will.  This should be a concern to all business owners.  How far should government meddle?

(You might ask Chuck Barber who received a letter of franchise termination from President Obama in 2009, and who found that his family business he had invested in and spent his life building was unilaterally stolen from him and given to a competitor down the street.)

The article stated that the governor “is calling for a leader who can bring the fractured party together.”

Fractured party?  The governor may not be aware, but in the largest counties (including some of the most liberal counties), the “COUNT/BUY MY VOTE” proposal has been soundly defeated by the delegates who understand the constitutional question at stake.

Calling the Utah GOP a “fractured” party is more of a fractured fairytale.  But the Count/Buy My Vote crowd owns the media here, so it was no surprise.

Consider this:  If you belong to a church, do you believe the legislature should be allowed to step in and tell your church how it selects its leaders, what its membership qualifications must be and what its tenets must be?

(Actually, the Courts are attempting to force that on legislatures in one sticky area these days – the definition of marriage, and the steep fines levied against family owned businesses that believe their religious liberty is being infringed if they are forced to provide wedding services for those whose wedding vows violate their religious beliefs.  But let’s not go there for now.)

The governor continued to perpetuate – no, to create – his own civil war (he is the defendant in this legal case, what more could we expect?) with us when he said, “…the chairman needs to work very diligently to unite the party.”

Where has this governor been lately?

This chairman, James Evans, is communicating with members of the party as best he can, in spite of the false press this paper continues to perpetuate.   The dissenters are very few.  The State Central Committee meeting coming up this Saturday is anticipated to be very supportive of the lawsuit and the proposals on the agenda.

The governor has fabricated this “civil war.”  The unpopular challenge made by elitists that don’t even engage in the party, but have for a long time controlled from the shadows with their big bucks, is uniting this party more than ever.  This challenge is actually strengthening the party.

Then the governor commented that he has not decided whether to endorse a candidate for party chairman.  This governor apparently believes that his endorsement will have any impact.  Governors do not own political parties in caucus states.  The people who are engaged do.  In states with open primaries and dual tracks allowing unaffiliated and anyone to petition onto the ballot in a party’s name and that are elected by plurality instead of majority, yes, the elites DO own the party.  That’s what the delegates that support the caucus are trying to preserve – the people’s voice – those that choose to be engaged in the process by attending their neighborhood meetings and being elected by those neighbors.

The governor needs to know that we do not feel any discord.  We are more united than ever.  Who is he getting his information from?  We know that answer.  From the elites that are funding his campaign.  He has entered the ranks of the politically corrupted, good as he is in his personal family life.  It happens all the time.

And that’s at the crux of what we are hoping to preserve in the lawsuit – an ability to stop corrupted politicians – the incumbents who become so after each subsequent term in office.

The Deseret News then states that SB 54 was a “compromise.”  No, it was not a compromise.  We have proof in writing and audio that the Count/Buy My Vote leaders were satisfied that they got exactly what they wanted in the first place with SB 54.

Senator Bob Bennett’s opinion editorial reiterates this inevitable outcome.  He was the catalyst for the Count/Buy My Vote challenge.  Invariably, I have learned as I’ve mingled with them, that they have one thing in common:  They despise Senator Mike Lee and carry enormous resentment against anyone that ran against him and helped defeat him.  This challenge is really nothing more than “sour grapes” from some Bennett diehards that have never gotten over it, even though their candidate clearly has.

The paper also misstated the purpose of the State Central Committee’s meeting on May 30 and its upcoming convention.  We are not there to decide whether we will agree to SB 54 or not.  We are there to chart a legal course to make sure we have Republican candidates on the 2016 ballot and that we WIN the lawsuit (that the judge has told us we will most likely win on constitutional grounds), by so doing.  Let it understood:  The delegates and State Central Committee members have shown in their recent county conventions that they DO NOT support Count/Buy My Vote or SB 54 by virtue of who they elected.  The party survey to which 4,500 have responded so far also show strong support for winning the lawsuit.

A rare exception is Davis County where several of the Count/Buy My Vote leaders live and network.  However, the chairman lost his election only by only three votes, with five votes in his favor that were “misplaced.”  It is a messy day led by a few disgruntled delegates that have since been caught obfuscating the truth.  The body of delegates overwhelmingly passed the resolution to continue to win the lawsuit, while Senator Todd Weiler’s resolution thanking himself and his colleagues for their support of SB 54 barely squeaked by (more of an uncomfortable vote there – many delegates find it difficult to call out an individual Republican official publicly).  More on that county soon…

The Governor’s main concern is that the party maintain its Good Ol’ Boy system so that he can get re-elected by this elitist friends that have rallied to corrupt his views on so many very un-Republican positions such as his support of socialized medicine and putting in place the three policies that will allow the ACA to succeed (ObamaCare), rather than working to defeat it.  Also is his support of progressive education and the national takeover through common core standards and testing.  A third contention is his support of amnesty, which has made Utah the fourth largest sanctuary state in the nation and costing us millions annually (hence the need for “expansion”).

The article got one thing right:  Governor Herbert considers  himself to be the party leader, but he really has no authority.  (Look up the definition of “titular”).  He is technically, in fact, the individual the party is suing because he signed the law that created this disagreement.

The humor of the day was his spokesman Marty Carpenter’s statement, “We want to make sure we have good, conservative Republicans elected.”

The purpose of my blog site is to expose what is conservative and what is not.  Check out these legislative score cards.  You may be surprised how not conservative the state of Utah is.  Reality check.  It begins with the governor’s office.

Additionally, the Deseret News continues to make the injunction loss a big issue.  Attorneys know that injunctions are often lost (they are typically a preliminary step to get the sense of the judge on key points before proceeding) and then the cases move forward and win.  Such is the case.  But this is understandable.  The Deseret News stands to gain from the open primaries.  They will experience a windfall with dozens more media buys from primary candidates flocking to the ballot line.  The paper’s support of Count/Buy My Vote is purely self-interest and its long-standing collaboration with Dan Jones opinion shaping surveys and LaVarr Webb’s media firm Exoro Group.

Kirk Jowers – the DC lobbyist that got the ball rolling through his firm that supports the Democratic National Committee and that created Stephen Colbert’s Super PAC to mock Republican candidates is not worth commenting on here.  You get the point with his mere credentials.

As for the GOP legislative members that voted for SB 54, the delegates have taken note and those that show mediocre to low score cards when held up to the party platform will be held accountable.  If anything good has come from this disagreement, it is that the delegates are now paying much more attention.

The constituents of Representative Dan McCay might want to especially consider a growing attitude problem with their representative.  At times he has been flippant (e.g. admitting the school system is a socialist system, and suggesting we make it more so with a bill that came under fire by conservatives). His most recent comment puts him in the “arrogant incumbent” category when he said that the delegates and party leaders were “engaged in childlike behavior.”

I replied, “You, Dan, are not my parent.”  I suggested that HE was the one that needed to be given a good spanking over his mother’s knee.

The rest of the news about who’s who to challenge Chairman James Evans is not worth discussing.  It’s simply a big YAWN on a slow news day.  The fodder the news tries to create by stirring up the pot that isn’t even boiling is bigger news.  Our concern is that in the middle of a lawsuit, we maintain consistently.  We don’t need to be debating on two fronts.  James Evans has done a good job of keeping us united.

Count/Buy My Vote’s Rich McKeown, made the comment of the century when he said they are “staying out of the race” (for party chairman) and that it will not be taking “any official position on the chairman’s race.”

It doesn’t need to, and that’s not how the elite establishment works.  As he said, they work behind the scenes.  Party leaders, delegates, coalitions and campaigns have never known any of them to show up, become involved and to engage with the unwashed masses.  They do their work by throwing their money around in the media to influence the readers with their distortions.

PS.  Here are some insightful comments posted on Facebook by Dana Dickson, an active supporter of the caucus:

The Deseret News stirs the pot a little with this article and here are my takeaways:

  • This is a notification to UTGOP State Central Committee members, ahead of this Saturday’s meeting, that they are to quit making a fuss and conform to CMV’s wishes.
  • Someone let Marty Carpenter know that “the party continue to produce strong results” and conforming to SB54 are mutually exclusive things since SB54 allows non-party voters to choose Republican candidates.
  • The Governor rightly acknowledges how difficult it has been for Chairman Evans to defend the Caucus/Convention system, as the delegates elected him to do, which is good. But he neglects to mention that Chairman Evans has had to do this while being undermined by the press, past party chairs, and legislators like Dan McCay.
  • The results of the recent UTGOP survey have provided critical guidance Governor Herbert, Chairman Evans, and the legislature all agree on.